Text and Submission

I love writing. Love it. It’s all I ever wanted to do; the tricky thing is if you are ever going to make any money from it then you really need a literary agent and to get a literary agent you have to tackle the thing that I hate more than anything: submissions.

It’s like writing an uber CV. Sell, sell, sell. It’s not enough to go ‘here are a couple of chapters, let me know what you think’ you need to include a punchy synopsis, you need to pick out a USP, you need to let them know why your book is the one out of the piles that they receive that they need to take onto their books. And it’s hard.

The rejections are even harder, the ‘I liked it, I just didn’t LOVE it.’s hurt more than the standard rejection letters.

But it has to be done. I believe in myself, I believe in the praise that Tiger Tiger has received and I believe that one day a submission will be successful. In the meantime I’ve just got to do a Dory.

Just keep swimming, just keep swimming…

Tiger Tiger is available from the Kindle Store http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tiger-ebook/dp/B00D5EYHAM

“I love my rejection slips. They show me I try.”

Sylvia Plath is somewhat of a heroine of mine. I have an excerpt from ‘Mad Girls’ Love Song’ tattooed on my forearm. I like to lose myself in her words. I also like to look to her for inspirational quotes.

“I love my rejection slips. They show me I try.”

Is one of my favourites, and one that is uppermost in my mind today.

As well as Tiger Tiger I have another completed book, a children’s book titled ‘Grimalkin Grumblepuss and the Case of the Vampire Dentures.’ I recently submitted it to an agent who I felt was looking for books very similar to Grimalkin. I had high hopes. Yesterday I received the rejection:

“Thank you for giving me a shot with this. It has some lovely points, but when I take a new writer on I have to feel sure I can sell their book well, and I’m afraid I’m not quite there with this.

Of course it’s a subjective business, and another agent may well love.

Best of luck with it.”

It’s one of the nicest rejections I’ve received (trust me on this) and I’m trying to just cling to the positives in it. Though if nothing else it shows me I try.

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Tiger Tiger is available from the Kindle Store at a promotional price of £1.99 http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00D5EYHAM/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

What’s In A Name..?

When can a writer describe themselves as a writer? Is there certain criteria that you need to hit in order to state that as your profession rather than your hobby? Like how often you write each day? Or how much money it makes you? Or is it like gender or ethnicity? It’s simply down to what you identify as? Though if that is the case perhaps I would like to identify as a supermodel as much as the majority would disagree.

Let’s accept for now an ‘I write, therefore I am a writer’ perspective; then when does a writer become an author? An author is broadly defined as “the person who originated or gave existence to anything” and whose authorship determines responsibility for what was created. Narrowly defined, an author is the originator of any written work.

So by definition I can describe myself as not merely a writer, but an author. Awesome.

So when does an author become a novelist? In Tiger Tiger the eponomous heroine, Rebecca Somersby describes herself as a novelist before she has written a novel: 

“allows me to indulge in my actual profession, which is being a novelist. I say novelist, I haven’t actually written a novel yet but I definitely intend to soon therefore that is who I am and what I do…”

 

Is this fraudulant representation on Rebecca’s behalf or are we allowed to call ourselves what we feel inside?

My name is Nicola Sheehan. I am a writer, an author, a novelist, a burlesque superstar, a Man Booker prize winner and I am going to rule the world!

One step at a time, eh..?

 

In the meantime Tiger Tiger is available for the Kindle Store on a summer promotional price of £1.99, go, read it…

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00D5EYHAM/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Childhood Dreams

ImageIt’s a funny old thing inspiration. Those little things that strike a chord in us and help us to build our ambitions. For me, as a child, my driving force was the Munch Bunch. Not because I identified ‘Raggy Doll’ stylee with the fruit ‘n’ veg outcasts but because on the back cover there was a photo of the young girl, Angela Mitson, who had created the characters. I thought if she can do it then so can I.

Ok so it’s taken me 20 odd years but I’m finally doing what I love. I’m writing.

My debut novel Tiger Tiger is available here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00D5EYHAM/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

The First Review

It’s inevitable, you write a book, it’s available for the general public to read, you watch copies being bought, cross your fingers that it is being enjoyed and then it happens: the review.

I felt my heart leap to my throat when I saw the first review had been written. What if it was scathing? What if I was kidding myself that I could write, that being an author was anything more than a pipe-dream? Then I read it: http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/B00D5EYHAM/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1 and I relaxed. Let’s just hope it’s the first of many.