The Difficult Second Novel…

I’ve been writing my follow up to Tiger Tiger for a while. It’s not a sequel, I decided that Rebecca Somersby was best off as a one diary kind of gal (I’m still reeling from the disappointment that came with ‘Edge of Reason’). It’s called ‘Fidelity Wars’, it looks at five characters and how they bend the rules of fidelity to allow for their individual indiscretions.

I know each of the characters inside out. I’ve plotted out their story arcs chapter by chapter. I’ve even completely finished two of the five ‘heroines’ tales. It was all going quite well. It excited me. It felt fresh and exhilarating. Then I decided to publish Tiger Tiger (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tiger-ebook/dp/B00D5EYHAM/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1372865918&sr=1-1&keywords=tiger+tiger+nicola+sheehan) almost as a precursor to the completion and subsequent promotion of ‘Fidelity Wars’. And it’s got awesome feedback.

And there’s the catch, ‘Tiger Tiger’ has been so well received and ‘Fidelity Wars’ is really very different and so I’m suddenly struck with rather crippling writer’s block at the thought that I’m writing something that might disappoint.

I see camping in a coffee shop and lots of frustrated screen gazing in my near future…

Childhood Dreams

ImageIt’s a funny old thing inspiration. Those little things that strike a chord in us and help us to build our ambitions. For me, as a child, my driving force was the Munch Bunch. Not because I identified ‘Raggy Doll’ stylee with the fruit ‘n’ veg outcasts but because on the back cover there was a photo of the young girl, Angela Mitson, who had created the characters. I thought if she can do it then so can I.

Ok so it’s taken me 20 odd years but I’m finally doing what I love. I’m writing.

My debut novel Tiger Tiger is available here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00D5EYHAM/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Skinny White Latte With Caramel Syrup & Community Spirit, Please.

ImageI live in Southgate, a fairly sleepy suburb of North London. It’s one of those areas of London that prides itself on having a village atmosphere; an amalgamation of restaurants and coffee shops, small independent shops existing in harmony next to big multinationals. So when I came to distributing my promotional posters asking people to support a local author I packed a healthy bundle ready to cover the notice boards of Southgate with my glossy posters.

However as I went around the coffee shops searching for community notice boards I found nothing. Zilch. Nada. The community spirit in the London village is seemingly non existent. Feeling a little disheartened I went to my ‘regular’ coffee shop, the place that I go most days either to set up a little office away from home, or to buy an edifying post-rough-night coffee, or as an after school treat with my five year old (because he is treated like royalty in there). Despondent at my lack of success elsewhere I console myself by replacing my old shabby (pre-Aimee Creative) poster with a new one and leaving some flyers on the counter. The manager, Colin, picks up a flyer, asks what I’ve been up to, says he’ll buy my book. My order is known without me giving it. This coffee shop is like a home from home, it’s like ‘Cheers’, where everybody knows your name. This coffee shop does do community, I’ve made friends, contacts here but this particular coffee shop has come under fire for being a wolf in sheep’s clothing. It’s a Harris + Hoole.

For those of you who don’t know, Harris + Hoole are a new chain popping up over London, the brainchild of the Tolley siblings who had previously run independent coffee shops in London and Brighton who wanted to bring great coffee to the masses. To do this they sought funding from Tesco, the Beelzebub of the retail world and have faced criticism in the press about Tesco holding a non controlling share of their company, about ‘pretending’ to be independent and ‘playing’ at being community spirited. Rhubarb to that, I say. Harris + Hoole Southgate is my office, my sanctuary; the staff show interest in me, in my work. They support me, they make me amazing coffee, they wake me up when I’m exhausted, they change the radio station when the wittering of Nick Grimshaw is interfering with the dialogue I’m writing. I’m not a fan of Tesco by any stretch of the imagination but community spirit is rare and isn’t something that can be put on and is something that is seemingly dead elsewhere in my London village. So I’ll stand and be counted, thank you Harris + Hoole, long may you continue to be my office and the only local bearer of my promotional poster.

(Tiger Tiger is available now in the Kindle Store: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00D5EYHAM/ref=cm_cr_error)

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But I don’t have a Kindle…

I’m hearing this a lot. Lots of people don’t have Kindles, I get it. I like the smell and feel of real books too but in the cut-throat world of modern publishing eBooks are often the best route for authors like me.

Now Amazon want to sell Kindles so they don’t make it that obvious that you can read Kindle books without a Kindle but you can!

You can read Kindle books on:

a computer

a smartphone

a tablet

You just need the free Kindle app. SO go to Amazon and search ‘Tiger Tiger Nicola Sheehan’ and the right hand side of the screen will appear as below.

Then you can install the software for free on whichever platform you choose, sign in with your Amazon password and even get a sample of the book before you choose to downoad it. Simple really!

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

How sampling works

Read books on your computer or other mobile devices with ourFREE Kindle Reading Apps.

Genre Schmenre

The other day I asked a good friend of mine if she planned to download Tiger Tiger.

“I don’t really think it’s my sort of thing” she responded.

This is fine on it’s own, different people like different things but on this occasion it confused me. It’s not like this friend only reads fantasy books or crime fiction, I thought that we had quite similar tastes and (not just because I wrote it) Tiger Tiger is the kind of thing that I’d read. I looked puzzled:

“Oh?”

“Well I read Fifty Shades and I hated it. I tried all three books but it’s really not for me.”

My flabber was well and truly gasted. Tiger Tiger is definitely not in the same ilk as Fifty Shades of Grey; not that I’m criticizing anyone who likes Fifty Shades but it’s definitely not the same genre. Which is the thought that led to my stuttering response. The same stuttering, clumsy response that I’ve given to many friends who have asked about genre…

“It’s romantic comedy, but kind of more comedy than romance, that is to say it’s not a traditional romance, not Mills & Boon-y or anything. It’s a bit Bridget Jones-y, but different. It’s… gah.”

And I fail to describe it. I get the occasional “Oh I like Bridget Jones” but I don’t want to sell it off that comparison. It is what it is. It will make you laugh, might make you cry, is honest, and sweet and written with love. I don’t think that’s a genre though.